Wednesday 30 July 2014

A Bruising Battle

PUTEAUX, France, July 29th - A few hours ago, the Japanese Professional Mahjong League JPML posted a video of the final hanchan of the World Riichi Mahjong Championship. In this hanchan, which lasted for over two hours, a bruising battle took place between four Japanese: Hiroshi Yamai, Kazuhiko Nishijima, Jun Nishikawa and Noriyuki Kiriyama.


Martin Rep resigns

Rep

PUTEAUX, July 16th - Martin Rep, founder of Mahjong News, resigns as the editor of the one and only Independent Internet Mahjong Newspaper. He made his decision public in a speech which he delivered during the opening ceremony of the World Riichi Championship in Puteaux. He will be succeeded by Scott D. Miller, who has been an associate editor for some months.

Mr. Rep (1946) is a professional journalist. He was involved in organizing the first Open European Mahjong Championship (Nijmegen, 2005) and the first European Riichi Mahjong Championship (Hanover, 2008). The World Riichi Championship 2014 was initialized by him.

Mr. Scott D. Miller is the author of the mahjong instruction book ‘Mahjong From A to Zhú’ (Psionic Press 2013) and an instructor of the game at Amarillo College. He played in the European Riichi Mahjong Championship 2013 in Austria and was a referee in the World Riichi Mahjong Championship.

 

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‘Hip’ in NY, far from ‘cool’ in HK

HONG KONG - The other day, the Wall Street Journal reported about the comeback of ‘mah-jongg’ in New York. But the same journal also concludes that in Hong Kong, in the home country of the game, mahjong is anything but cool.

In an article about mahjong parlors in Hong Kong, a club manager is quoted who claims that “most of the time, we get office ladies or tai tais (married women) who come and play at the end of the day from 6 p.m. until 2 in the morning.”

“There are some younger kids who play mahjong, but it’s not seen as something posh more so than seedy. It is gambling, after all.”

Another manager claims that the problem with mahjong is the huge investment of time it requires. “A proper mah-jongg game can last eight hours or a whole day. It works on a point system, and you can’t just pull out after one round of games.”

 

Read the full article in WSJ Online



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